Category Archives: Books

Learning 715

To achieve anything three interconnected and interwoven forms of discipline are needed – perception, will and the action.

Only the people who have learned how to see situations for what they truly are can capitalize on hidden details. You can choose to see what you want to see. You could focus on negatives or magnify possibilities and the chances that each barrier avails.

“My life is one long obstacle course with me as the chief obstacle.”

Closed doors are not always what they appear to be. It all depends how you see it. To you it is a dead end, to some, it is a chance to find new routes or blaze a trial through it, and teach others to follow.

“You are the biggest obstacle, but you are also the change that you seek.”

Shaping your perspective allows you to fixate on those slim chances. There are things that you might not have the power to control, but choosing to give it your all is totally within your domain.

True to this, the most compelling success stories are those that feature people who had challenged seemingly impossible feats. As such, live in the present, think differently and believe that there is nothing beyond you. Now, you are ready to put all this mind conditioning talk to work, it is time to act.

“To believe in something and not to live it, is dishonest.”

You have to put it to work, act on your perception, overcome the barriers, and prepare for the next one. Chances are that someone or something is going to stand in your way. That’s a given, the most important information, thereafter is your actions or inactions.

Great people on the other hand capitalize on some of the faintest hints of success, and they never look back.

In other words, you do not need all the stars to align, all you need is one star, and then get moving.

Nevertheless, sometimes success does not come cheap. You might need to throw everything you have at the obstacle.

In a way, persistence helps us to find new ways of doing things, especially when we have exhausted all the conventional solutions. With each trial and error, we find iterations that are unsuitable and failures that teach us what and where to improve.

Follow the process: fail, learn and improve.

In essence, the future might look bleak for now, but the progress you have made today is the only assurance that you are heading in the right direction.

Whatever you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it.

Doing work and working smartly are two different things. Always find an edge. Smart people do less work because they prefer exerting force on more meaningful things. Turn your defeat into a template for you to learn.

“I am a pessimist because of intelligence and an optimist because of will.”

Regardless of the setback, you should not stop having a passion for what you do.

Passion in itself pushes you to help others fighting defeats, it sets you on a pedestal of leadership where your failures could motivate the lost.

Identify the goals, thereafter outline all the challenges you might face, and get your mind prepared for the confrontation ahead. Map out a strategy and get to work.

Learning 714

OBSTACLES ARE THE STEPPING STONES TO SUCCESS

Those who had found it and lived by it had gone to carve their names in history. They understood that struggles, battles, barriers, and challenges are all a part of the process. More so, they have the responsibility to turn them into opportunities. However, this capability is not restricted to a select few, you too can ride the waves of challenges to your destination.

“We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.”

“The Obstacle is the way.”

Learning 713

You can change your lifestyle – diet, exercise and sleep, in 4 weeks.

By focusing on one aspect of your life per week, it is possible for you to change your lifestyle in a month.

Begin with your feeding habits in the first week.

Then add an exercise routine in the second week.

The third week should focus on sleep while the fourth week will bring all three aspects together.

To begin, a 24-hour water-only fast is recommended. A baseline blood test and an evaluation from a doctor is also essential.

While there may not be visible changes immediately, you should remain undeterred because the effects of elimination of gluten and reduction of carbs may take a while to kick in.

Set realistic and achievable goals. Do not make the changes drastic. Small increments are better. A change in lifestyle is a marathon and not a sprint.”

Highlights from Grain Brain

Learning 703

What’s wealth and what the rich focus at? Here’s great answers by Robert Kiyosaki.

“Wealth is a person’s ability to survive so many number of days forward or if I stopped working today, how long could I survive.” – R. Buckminster Fuller

“The rich focus on their asset columns while everyone else focuses on their income statements.”

In 1974, Ray Kroc, the founder of McDonald’s, was asked to speak to the MBA class at the University of Texas at Austin. After a powerful and inspiring talk, Ray was asked by the students to join them at their favorite hangout to have few beers, to which Ray accepted graciously.

At that time Ray asked, ‘What business am I in?’

Everyone laughed, thinking Ray was just fooling around.

When no one answered, Ray asked again, ‘What business do you think I’m in?’

The students laughed again, when finally one brave soul yelled out, ‘Ray, who in the world doesn’t know that you’re in the hamburger business? ‘

Ray chuckled, ‘That’s what I thought you would say.’ He paused and then quickly added, ‘Ladies and Gentlemen, I’m not in the hamburger business. My business is real estate. ‘

Ray spent a good amount of time explaining his viewpoint. In his business plan, Ray knew that the primary business focus was to sell hamburger franchises, but what he never lost sight of was the location of each franchise. He knew that the land and its location were the most significant factors in the success of each franchise. Basically, the person who bought the franchise was also buying the real estate under the franchise for Ray Kroc’s organization.

Today McDonald’s is one of the largest owner of real estate in the world. McDonald’s owns some of the most valuable intersections and street corners in America and around the globe.

Most people work for everyone but themselves. Financial struggle is often directly the result of people working all their lives for someone else.

There is a big difference between your profession and your business. When asked, ‘What’s your business?’ people say, ‘I’m a banker.’ And when further asked whether they own the bank, they say ‘No, I work there.’ They are confused their profession with their business.

A problem with school is that you often become what you study. The mistake in becoming what you study is that too many people forget to mind their own business. They spend their lives minding someone else’s business and making them rich. Start minding your own business. Keep your daytime job, but start buying real assets, not liabilities or personal effects that have no real value once you get them home. A new car loses nearly 25 % of the price you pay for it the moment you drive it off the lot.

Keep expenses low, reduce liabilities, and diligently build a base of solid assets. As per author’s view real assets fall into following categories:

Learning 701

Proper physical exercise increases your chances for health, and proper mental exercise increases your chances for wealth. 

There is a difference between being poor and being broke. Broke is temporary. Poor is eternal. The poor and the middle class work for money. The rich have money work for them.

Too many people are too focused on money and not on their greatest wealth their education. If people are prepared to be flexible, keep an open mind and learn, they will grow richer and richer despite tough changes. If they think money will solve problems, they will have a rough ride. Intelligence solve problems and produces money. Money without financial intelligence is money soon gone. 

Most people fail to realise that in life, it’s not how much money you make. It’s how much money you keep. We’ve all heard stories of lottery winners who are poor, then suddenly rich and then poor again. Or stories of professional athletes, who at the age of 24 are earning millions, but are sleeping under the bridge 10 years later. 

In the long run, it’s not how much money you make. It’s how much you keep, and how many generations you keep it. If you want to be rich, you need to be financially literate. 

Most people, in their drive to get rich, try to build an Empire State Building on a six inch slab. While they are ignorant that they need to dig a deep hole and pour a strong foundation. 

Accounting is possibly the most confusing, boring subject in the world, but if you want to be rich long term, it could be the most important subject. 

Cash flow tells the story of how a person handles money. Money only accentuates the cash flow pattern running in your head. If your pattern is to spend everything you get, most likely an increase in cash will just result in an increase in spending. Thus the saying, “A fool and his money is one big party.”

Most people work harder but don’t get ahead. What is missing from their education is not how to make money, but how to manage money. It’s called financial aptitude – what to do with money once you make it, how to keep people from taking it from you, how to keep it longer, and how to make that money work harder for you. Most people don’t understand why they struggle financially because they don’t understand cash flow. 

There’s an important saying for people in debt, “If you find you have dug yourself into a hole…. Stop digging.” 

Learning 673

Carrot, or stick? You’ve probably heard these two words used to describe incentives for people to do things they may not want to do. 

A carrot is a reward, and a stick is a punishment. A carrot-and-stick approach is not only effective in changing behavior but also best-suited to encourage people to put long-term goals before short-term satisfaction.

Tiny sticks aren’t a deterrent. A big stick, however, makes a potential lawbreaker think twice.

So reprimanding bad behavior is the best way to ensure commitment to long-term goals. Yet for a cash fine to act as an actual deterrent, it is essential that the amount be substantial.

The higher the fine, in fact, the more effective the punishment! Modest fines only put a price tag on bad behavior. Instead of taking the behavior off the table entirely, a small fine makes bad behavior something that’s okay, if you don’t mind shelling out a few bucks.

In sum, fines that could help lawbreakers feel less bad about breaking rules aren’t exactly good fines. Yet if a fine was to go toward something that society generally disapproved of, a potential lawbreaker might make more of an effort to avoid fines by breaking fewer rules.

Lots of little sticks might feel like a tickle. Hit with a big stick, and you can’t help but capitulate.

For instance, cigarette taxes have little effect on the number of smokers because the added cost for each pack is too insignificant to represent an effective punishment for smoking. In other words, the temptation to smoke still outweighs the punishment.

A better option would be to enact instead one large punishment. One big stick gives a person pause, and is much more likely to deter a smoker in a moment of temptation.

Several researchers have suggested replacing the few dollars of tax levied on each pack of cigarettes sold with a smoking permit which, for $5,000, would allow the permit bearer to buy 2,500 cigarettes.

While a smoker might be able to stomach a few bucks with each pack, the enormous cost of a permit could quickly curb behavior at a stroke. And in the end, this big stick would prevent a crippling addiction from causing long-term damage.

It’s true that often, the only way to really change human behavior is through severe punishment!

You also need to set yourself up with a commitment contract. A referee will help keep you in line to meet your goals.

Sticks and carrots offer effective incentives for curbing bad behavior. Yet we also need effective tools to overcome our addiction to now. One way to do this is to make an agreement with yourself, called a commitment contract.

Commitment contracts offer a formal way of taking undesirable behavior off the table. In effect, they’re a way of tying your hands to prevent you from doing bad things in the future.

But how can you effectively establish a commitment contract? For a contract to really make an impact, the punishment for not following through has to be as serious as the bad behavior the contract addresses. Thus severe punishment and public exposure is what will keep you in line.  

For instance, the drug Antabuse helps people avoid drinking alcohol by giving them an immediate hangover as soon as they have a drink.

Commitment contracts should also incorporate a degree of public exposure. What our friends and colleagues think of us often drives our behavior. We react to social pressures by behaving in ways to protect ourselves from ridicule.

For example, a professor committed himself to losing weight by saying he would teach class wearing a swimsuit if he failed to meet his goal. While his idea was extreme, it was effective!

Finding an impartial referee is another element in establishing an effective commitment contract. The success of every contract relies on a reliable authority who can ensure the application of agreed-upon punishments for bad behavior. Without a referee, punishment can easily be avoided.

Don’t just choose a friend to be your referee, as he might go easy on you and let your bad behavior slide. But don’t hire an enemy for the job, either. It’s essential to trust that your referee will be fair and help you achieve your goals!

Long-term changes require realistic goals and long-term commitment contracts. To achieve permanent change, you need to set realistic goals.

For instance, most obese people who decide to lose weight aim to do so by working toward significantly shedding more than 10 percent of their current weight. But reducing your weight by some 10 percent is a serious task! Most dieters often lose a lot of weight quickly, only for their success to be short-lived.

But having realistic goals isn’t enough. You also need a long-term commitment contract to suit them. For instance, a commitment contract for a dietary goal is usually based on the one-time loss of a certain amount of weight. Therefore, an additional commitment contract is necessary to ensure that a dieter then keeps the weight off.
Such a contract should address things like a daily commitment to weight control, a punishment for exceeding a certain weight and a weight range in which the dieter is expected to naturally fluctuate. Only by making long-term commitment contracts like that can you reach your goals and stick with them!

We are slaves to now and often forgo long-term benefits to indulge in immediate rewards. Lucky for us, there’s a way to overcome this bad habit and it starts with carrots and sticks, or rewards and repercussions.

Make your long-term goals a reality with commitment contracts. The next time you decide to make a major life change like quitting smoking, losing weight or saving money, make sure you follow through by drafting a commitment contract. It’s easy to build an effective contract for yourself as long as you set realistic goals and severe punishments for failing to meet them.

Learning 673

Carrot, or stick? You’ve probably heard these two words used to describe incentives for people to do things they may not want to do. 

A carrot is a reward, and a stick is a punishment. A carrot-and-stick approach is not only effective in changing behavior but also best-suited to encourage people to put long-term goals before short-term satisfaction.

Tiny sticks aren’t a deterrent. A big stick, however, makes a potential lawbreaker think twice.

So reprimanding bad behavior is the best way to ensure commitment to long-term goals. Yet for a cash fine to act as an actual deterrent, it is essential that the amount be substantial.

The higher the fine, in fact, the more effective the punishment! Modest fines only put a price tag on bad behavior. Instead of taking the behavior off the table entirely, a small fine makes bad behavior something that’s okay, if you don’t mind shelling out a few bucks.

In sum, fines that could help lawbreakers feel less bad about breaking rules aren’t exactly good fines. Yet if a fine was to go toward something that society generally disapproved of, a potential lawbreaker might make more of an effort to avoid fines by breaking fewer rules.

Lots of little sticks might feel like a tickle. Hit with a big stick, and you can’t help but capitulate.

For instance, cigarette taxes have little effect on the number of smokers because the added cost for each pack is too insignificant to represent an effective punishment for smoking. In other words, the temptation to smoke still outweighs the punishment.

A better option would be to enact instead one large punishment. One big stick gives a person pause, and is much more likely to deter a smoker in a moment of temptation.

Several researchers have suggested replacing the few dollars of tax levied on each pack of cigarettes sold with a smoking permit which, for $5,000, would allow the permit bearer to buy 2,500 cigarettes.

While a smoker might be able to stomach a few bucks with each pack, the enormous cost of a permit could quickly curb behavior at a stroke. And in the end, this big stick would prevent a crippling addiction from causing long-term damage.

It’s true that often, the only way to really change human behavior is through severe punishment!

You also need to set yourself up with a commitment contract. A referee will help keep you in line to meet your goals.

Sticks and carrots offer effective incentives for curbing bad behavior. Yet we also need effective tools to overcome our addiction to now. One way to do this is to make an agreement with yourself, called a commitment contract.

Commitment contracts offer a formal way of taking undesirable behavior off the table. In effect, they’re a way of tying your hands to prevent you from doing bad things in the future.

But how can you effectively establish a commitment contract? For a contract to really make an impact, the punishment for not following through has to be as serious as the bad behavior the contract addresses. Thus severe punishment and public exposure is what will keep you in line.  

For instance, the drug Antabuse helps people avoid drinking alcohol by giving them an immediate hangover as soon as they have a drink.

Commitment contracts should also incorporate a degree of public exposure. What our friends and colleagues think of us often drives our behavior. We react to social pressures by behaving in ways to protect ourselves from ridicule.

For example, a professor committed himself to losing weight by saying he would teach class wearing a swimsuit if he failed to meet his goal. While his idea was extreme, it was effective!

Finding an impartial referee is another element in establishing an effective commitment contract. The success of every contract relies on a reliable authority who can ensure the application of agreed-upon punishments for bad behavior. Without a referee, punishment can easily be avoided.

Don’t just choose a friend to be your referee, as he might go easy on you and let your bad behavior slide. But don’t hire an enemy for the job, either. It’s essential to trust that your referee will be fair and help you achieve your goals!

Long-term changes require realistic goals and long-term commitment contracts. To achieve permanent change, you need to set realistic goals.

For instance, most obese people who decide to lose weight aim to do so by working toward significantly shedding more than 10 percent of their current weight. But reducing your weight by some 10 percent is a serious task! Most dieters often lose a lot of weight quickly, only for their success to be short-lived.

But having realistic goals isn’t enough. You also need a long-term commitment contract to suit them. For instance, a commitment contract for a dietary goal is usually based on the one-time loss of a certain amount of weight. Therefore, an additional commitment contract is necessary to ensure that a dieter then keeps the weight off.
Such a contract should address things like a daily commitment to weight control, a punishment for exceeding a certain weight and a weight range in which the dieter is expected to naturally fluctuate. Only by making long-term commitment contracts like that can you reach your goals and stick with them!

We are slaves to now and often forgo long-term benefits to indulge in immediate rewards. Lucky for us, there’s a way to overcome this bad habit and it starts with carrots and sticks, or rewards and repercussions.

Make your long-term goals a reality with commitment contracts. The next time you decide to make a major life change like quitting smoking, losing weight or saving money, make sure you follow through by drafting a commitment contract. It’s easy to build an effective contract for yourself as long as you set realistic goals and severe punishments for failing to meet them.