Category Archives: daily real life learning

Learning 697

Dance as if no one’s watching.

Oprah was lucky enough to find herself dancing on stage one day with the legendary Tina Turner. In the beginning, she was afraid that she would mess up her dance routine in front of such a large audience. 

But as the show progressed, Oprah managed to overcome her self-consciousness, realizing that this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that she’d squander if she didn’t enjoy herself. 

The lesson, then, is to grab opportunities with both hands and to bask in the moment. This will ease your fear of judgment.

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Learning 696

Rather than being out of touch with your body, you should focus on your physical sensations.

When someone lets you down, it’s easy to lose your temper. When the author discovered that her son had failed yet again to do his homework, her first impulse was to angrily confront him. But then she opted for a different approach.

Before storming into her son’s room, she stopped and focused on the physical sensations her body was experiencing.

Amazingly, she felt herself calming down. Instead of concentrating on her furious thoughts and rushing toward a confrontation with her son, she focused her attention on how the anger was making her body feel. As soon as she became aware of her own body, she felt tenderness replace her anger.

She realized her anger was making her whole body tighten and her chest felt as if it was about to explode.

By becoming more attuned to how she was feeling, she became more attuned to how her son was feeling. This empathy helped her find the right things to say when she later had a conversation with him.

Remembering the connection between body and mind will help you make better decisions. Unfortunately, most of us remain out of touch with our bodies to the extent that we inhabit an entirely mental world.

We don’t pay enough attention to our physical sensations from moment to moment because we’re always planning what we’ll do next. For example, even when you hug a close friend, have you ever calculated how long you should embrace until you pull away?

This is too bad, since fully experiencing physical sensations, both positive and negative, can offer a sense of being alive and connected with every part of life. Even feeling the rain on your face can awaken your senses if you let yourself focus on the experience for long enough.

Learning 695

Truly  enlightened  people,  those  who experience  deep happiness  daily,  are  prepared to  put  off  short-term  pleasure  for the  sake  of long-term  fulfillment. 

So  they  tackle  their  weaknesses and  fears head  on,  even  if  dipping  into  the  zone  of  the unknown brings  with  it  a  measure  of discomfort.  They  resolve  to  live  by  the wisdom  of  kaizen,  improving  every  aspect  of themselves ceaselessly  and  continuously.  With time,  things  that  were  once difficult  become easy.  Fears  that  once  prevented  them  from all the happiness,  health  and  prosperity  they deserved  fall  to  the  wayside like  stickmen toppled  by  a  hurricane.

Happiness  comes  through  the progressive realization  of  a  worthy  objective.  When  you are  doing what you  truly  love  to  do  you  are bound  to  find  deep  contentment.

Doing  what  you  love,  whether  this  means giving  up  the  work  you  are  presently  doing to  become  an  actor  or spending  less  time  on those  things  that  are  less  important  to  make time  for  those  things  that  are  more meaningful,  requires  a  great deal  of  courage.

It  requires  you  to  step  out  of  your  comfort zone. And change  is  always  a  little uncomfortable  at  first.  It  is  also  more than  a little  risky.  Having  said  this,  this  is  the  surest way  to  design a  more  joyful  life.

Once  you  get  yourself  together, your  world will  be  okay.  Once  you  master  your  mind, body  and character,  happiness  and  abundance will  flow  into  your  life  almost magically.  But you  must  spend  some  time  daily  working  on yourself,  even  if  for  only  ten  or  fifteen minutes.

Learning 694

Be a kind and constant friend to yourself and your painful experiences.

When in a distressing situation, we tend to panic. If this sounds familiar, you can learn something from the story of Jacob, one of the author’s colleagues.

Jacob was an experienced meditation teacher, who was also in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Standing in front of a class of meditation students, he found himself suddenly confused and unsure of where he was. Importantly, though, Jacob didn’t panic. Instead, he told his students how he was feeling. He admitted to being scared, confused and disoriented.

Not the best meditation class, right? On the contrary!

Although it might sound disastrous for both the teacher and his class, the students thanked him afterward for one of the best lessons on meditation they’d ever received.

Why were his meditation students so impressed? Because instead of pushing away his negative experience – his fear and confusion – Jacob had the courage to express what he was experiencing.

Importantly, by naming his fear and confusion, Jacob honored his painful experience, instead of rejecting it as something that was “wrong” or unmentionable. He didn’t turn the experience into an enemy; he accepted and made friends with it. Jacob’s reaction was a shining example of radical acceptance.

When you recognize your emotions at any given moment and greet them with this unconditional friendliness, you’re practicing radical acceptance. In this state, you pay careful attention to your feelings, allowing yourself to accept them instead of making them into an enemy to recoil from.

This aspect of radical acceptance is crucial because it helps increase self-compassion.

Most of us are only friendly toward ourselves when we’re succeeding. As soon as we fail at something, we rush to self-judge and reject the parts of ourselves that are less than perfect. But ask yourself: Would you treat a good friend poorly if they failed at something? Hopefully not.

It can be difficult, but try to extend to yourself the same compassion and understanding you’d extend to your closest friend.

Learning 693

Nothing is impossible, it is rightly said, “whatever your mind can conceive, it can achieve.”
When I was a child, and had an interest towards sports, while trying myself at high jumps and long jumps, my mind conceived an idea that we humans can fly, if we try to jump and take another jump midway in the air and keep repeating so several times. 

That way we can fly to a little extent and it could be the highest high jump or longest long jump ever. But the gap lies in the conceivement of the idea and trying ourselves on that idea. 

For me it was just an idea, untill today I read something which is real and reminded me to the same idea, popularly known as Fosbury flop long time ago.

In the 1960s, athlete Dick Fosbury developed a unique approach to his high jump and improved his performance by six inches. Fosbury’s awkward, midair rotation became known as the Fosbury Flop, and even though experts dismissed it at first, the Flop landed him a gold medal at the 1968 Olympics. Eventually, the experts and fellow high-jumpers caught up with Fosbury’s “weird” technique – the Fosbury Flop has been the technique used by every gold medalist since 1972.

Go against the flow, and with enough persistence and clever placement, you’ll be well on your way to getting luck on your side.

Who knows the idea of human flight can be real, if someone tries hand on it and succeeds after several attempts? 

Learning 692

A lucky start in life means being taught as a child that your life is in your control.

Lucky children are happy children, and you can make your kids luckier by teaching them the principles of life from an early age.

To increase a child’s luck, you should show them the wealth of opportunities available to them, while refraining from forcing them down any particular path.

Dr. Jessica Levenstein, from the Horace Mann School, in New York, believes that children (and, by extension, adults) will be happier if they believe their lives are governed by their own actions, as opposed to by external actors. She explains that parents who refuse to allow their children to be educated by specific teachers – because, say, that teacher has a poor reputation – often stifle their children’s independence and learning.

For instance, the author once wanted to change her son’s teacher, but was encouraged by the school principal to approach the situation with a positive attitude and not get involved. Ultimately, her son and his teacher ended up getting along well and being a great fit for one another.

The author also talks about her own father’s habit of ignoring her report cards, and concerning himself instead with how she felt she had done.

By letting children see the effects of their own efforts, even if those efforts are mistakes, they’re able to learn a lot about themselves and the world.

Another thing you can teach children is that they don’t have to follow conventional paths.

In high school, Bill Gates and Paul Allen founded a tiny data-analysis business that didn’t really succeed but nonetheless went on to form the basis of Microsoft. Gates was amazed that his father, who had spoken with the headmaster, gave him the go-ahead rather than pushing him to focus on his studies. By allowing him to pursue seemingly unimportant adventures, his parents allowed the space to develop the self-belief that would later make him the successful and lucky billionaire we know today.

As you can see, it’s extremely important to build the foundations of success by showing children that they have control over their own decisions.

Luck is more in our control than we think. By following the principles outlined here – that is, combining hard work, talent and chance, and preparing and putting yourself in places where opportunity is likely to strike – you can increase your susceptibility to luck.

Actionable advice:

Steer through life with a compass, not a map.

To find the places where the opportunities to become lucky are high, you need to have a plan. But an overly rigid plan – that is, clearly defined life map – can cause you to miss those important opportunities. So trade out your map for a compass. If you know the general direction you wish to go in, you will be able to adapt if the landscape changes around you. It requires courage and self-confidence, but walking your own path will lead you to opportunities that might just change your luck.

Learning 691

People often resist happiness, but controlled breathing can help us overcome this fear.

No one said life would be easy, and sometimes it can really feel like an endless swamp of problems, but ask yourself this: Are you really prepared for a life of happiness?

Can you even imagine an entire day without having something to complain about?

Everyone has their own inner resistance to happiness, an oddly human trait that deserves some close scrutiny.

Despite spending a lot of time and energy striving for happiness, human beings aren’t especially comfortable or skilled at feeling good or being at peace.

School teaches us a lot of things, but there are no high school classes on how to deal with success and happiness.

If you were to take the time to look within and uncover why you resist happiness, the answer would likely be related to fear – a fear of achieving your full potential.

Because here’s the thing: when you become the best you can be, that means there’s no more excuse for why you aren’t making your dreams come true.

This is a fear that must be conquered if you truly want success and happiness. Taking the big leap into a life of happiness requires a great deal of confidence.

So let’s explore the ways you can learn to overcome this fear and start taking the right kinds of risks.

The first technique for breaking the fear barrier is breathing.

Back in the mid-1900s, psychiatrist Fritz Perls developed Gestalt therapy, which recognized that fear is, essentially, a sort of breathless excitement.

With some focused breathing, you can transform that fear into a positive and powerful excitement that can be used to make great things happen.

Let’s say you’re about to take the stage for a performance or to give a speech. The common reaction to a scary situation like this is for our breath to become constricted, which only makes the fear stronger.

But if you take a moment to breathe deeply, you can take control and transform the fear into the powerful energy that lets you take the stage and captivate your audience.