Category Archives: parenting

Learning 692

A lucky start in life means being taught as a child that your life is in your control.

Lucky children are happy children, and you can make your kids luckier by teaching them the principles of life from an early age.

To increase a child’s luck, you should show them the wealth of opportunities available to them, while refraining from forcing them down any particular path.

Dr. Jessica Levenstein, from the Horace Mann School, in New York, believes that children (and, by extension, adults) will be happier if they believe their lives are governed by their own actions, as opposed to by external actors. She explains that parents who refuse to allow their children to be educated by specific teachers – because, say, that teacher has a poor reputation – often stifle their children’s independence and learning.

For instance, the author once wanted to change her son’s teacher, but was encouraged by the school principal to approach the situation with a positive attitude and not get involved. Ultimately, her son and his teacher ended up getting along well and being a great fit for one another.

The author also talks about her own father’s habit of ignoring her report cards, and concerning himself instead with how she felt she had done.

By letting children see the effects of their own efforts, even if those efforts are mistakes, they’re able to learn a lot about themselves and the world.

Another thing you can teach children is that they don’t have to follow conventional paths.

In high school, Bill Gates and Paul Allen founded a tiny data-analysis business that didn’t really succeed but nonetheless went on to form the basis of Microsoft. Gates was amazed that his father, who had spoken with the headmaster, gave him the go-ahead rather than pushing him to focus on his studies. By allowing him to pursue seemingly unimportant adventures, his parents allowed the space to develop the self-belief that would later make him the successful and lucky billionaire we know today.

As you can see, it’s extremely important to build the foundations of success by showing children that they have control over their own decisions.

Luck is more in our control than we think. By following the principles outlined here – that is, combining hard work, talent and chance, and preparing and putting yourself in places where opportunity is likely to strike – you can increase your susceptibility to luck.

Actionable advice:

Steer through life with a compass, not a map.

To find the places where the opportunities to become lucky are high, you need to have a plan. But an overly rigid plan – that is, clearly defined life map – can cause you to miss those important opportunities. So trade out your map for a compass. If you know the general direction you wish to go in, you will be able to adapt if the landscape changes around you. It requires courage and self-confidence, but walking your own path will lead you to opportunities that might just change your luck.

When you thought I wasn’t looking 

A message every adult should read because children are watching you and doing as you do, not as you say.

When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you hang my first painting on the refrigerator, and I immediately wanted to paint another one.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you feed the birds in winter, and I learned that it was good to be kind to animals.

When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you make my favourite cake for me, and I learned that the little things can be the special things in life.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you make a meal and take it to a friend who was sick, and I learned that we all have to help take care of each other.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you take care of our house and everyone in it, and I learned we have to take care of what we are given.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw how you handled your responsibilities, even when you didn’t feel good, and I learned that I would have to be responsible when I grow up.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw you hold the door open for others and heard ‘thank you’ and ‘you’re welcome’, and I learned respect for others.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw tears come from your eyes, and I learned that sometimes things  hurt, but it’s all right to cry.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I saw that you cared, and I wanted to be everything that I could be..
When you thought I wasn’t looking I learned most of life’s lessons that I need to know to be a good and productive person when I grow up.
When you thought I wasn’t looking I looked at you and wanted to say, Thanks for all the things I saw when you thought I wasn’t looking.’
I AM SENDING THIS TO ALL OF THE PEOPLE I KNOW WHO DO SO MUCH FOR OTHERS, BUT THINK THAT NO ONE EVER SEES. 
LITTLE EYES SEE A LOT ..
Each of us (parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, teacher, friend) 

influence the life of a children.
How will you touch the life of someone today? 

Just by sending this to someone else, you will probably make them at least think about their influence on others. 

Live simply. 

Love generously. 

Care deeply.

Speak kindly. 

The story of watermelons by Manohar Parrikar 

“I am from the village of Parra in Goa, hence we are called Parrikars. My village is famous for its watermelons. 

When I was a child, the farmers would organise a watermelon-eating contest at the end of the harvest season in May. All the kids would be invited to eat as many watermelons as they wanted. 

Years later, I went to IIT Mumbai to study engineering. I went back to my village after 6.5 years. I went to the market looking for watermelons. They were all gone. The ones that were there were so small. 

I went to see the farmer who hosted the watermelon-eating contest. His son had taken over. He would host the contest but there was a difference. 

When the older farmer gave us watermelons to eat he would ask us to spit out the seeds into a bowl. We were told not to bite into the seeds. He was collecting the seeds for his next crop. We were unpaid child labourers, actually. 

He kept his best watermelons for the contest and he got the best seeds which would yield even bigger watermelons the next year. 

His son, when he took over, realised that the larger watermelons would fetch more money in the market so he sold the larger ones and kept the smaller ones for the contest. 

The next year, the watermelons were smaller, the year later even small. In watermelons the generation is one year. In seven years, Parra’s best watermelons were finished. 

In humans, generations change after 25 years. It will take us 200 years to figure what we were doing wrong while educating our children.”

Unless we employ our best to train the next generation, this is what can happen to us. We must attract the best.

Learning 468

“Instead of asking children what they want to do in future, ask them what they want to do now. Ask them their vision for a better world. Ask them what they are doing to change this world. Ask them the real life problems they are solving. This will allow you all to empower a new generation to go faster than any generation ever has.”