Category Archives: productivity

Learning 662

The Energy Bus – By Jon Gordon

10 rules for a new life. 

The first rule: become the driver of your own bus and take back control.

The second rule: with vision and focus, you can drive the bus in the direction you want.

Law of attraction.
According to this concept, all thoughts are magnetic, which means the things you think about will begin showing up in your life. Just take Olympic athletes, many of whom use the law of attraction by visualizing their best performances before entering a competition. Often this results in gold-medal wins. 

Just take the formula E + P = O. It says that Events + Perception/Positive Energy = Outcome. 

In other words, there are lots of things you’ve got no control over, but what you do control is how you perceive those events. So, by choosing to have positive thoughts, rather than negative ones, you can achieve better results.

The rule number three: This is key since positive energy is the fuel for your journey and it will keep your bus moving forward. But how can you keep that fuel tank topped up?

Sometimes it just requires approaching things from a different perspective.

If you have a lot of work to do, it can help to feel grateful for having a job in the first place, knowing that lots of people struggle to get work at all.

Such a simple act of gratitude will release endorphins and make you feel better before you know it. 

The rule number four: Tell people about your vision and ask them to join you on your journey. Whether it’s at work with your colleagues or at home with your partner, happiness and success often rely on teamwork.

It’s simple: the more people you get on your bus, the more positive energy you’ll have to fuel your ride and the more successful your results will be.

No one creates success in a vaccum and the people we surround ourselves with have a big influence on the life and success we create. 

The rule number five: Don’t waste energy on people who don’t share your vision; remove negative people whenever you can.

Save your energy and don’t try to convince people who aren’t ready to get on board. Just remember, if they’re full of negativity, they’ll only slow you down.

And if negative people do get on your bus, it’s essential to remove them as soon as you can. You might notice passengers who complain along the way. You can think of these people as vampires who suck out your positivity and vision.

The rule number six: is to get Energy Vampires off of your bus. To put it another way, if you have negative people on your team, sit them down and have a talk. Try to determine where their negative attitude comes from and how you can work together. If they’re unwilling to change, you have to let them go.

Or, in situations where you can’t get rid of problematic people, say your boss or supervisor, find ways to boost your own positive energy. If you can, you’ll outweigh the negativity they bring into your life.

Other people can feel your emotions and be inspired by your enthusiasm.

In other words, people around us can perceive the way we feel and respond to it. That’s why people can tell when someone is insincere. But it also means that when people are truly passionate about something, they share that enthusiasm and those positive emotions with others.

Because of this, it’s key to energize your whole bus, but when you do so, it’s also important it’s done with true enthusiasm. 

The rule number seven: enthusiasm will make more people join you and motivate them along the ride. In fact, the word “enthusiasm” comes from the Greek word entheos, meaning “inspired” or “filled with the divine.”

As long as you’re excited about your work and the tasks you’re doing, everyone around you will feel the same. This is the kind of positive energy you need to fuel your ride for the long haul.

The author events has a name for it your CEO or Chief Energy Officer. People who fill this role infect their team members, employees and even customers with powerful positive energy that inspires and propels them.

Make your passengers feel valued by giving them your time and recognition.

You’ve probably noticed that you work harder when others recognize your efforts and care about you. It seems obvious, but it points to a deeper human need for appreciation.

In other words, by loving your team members, you can make them feel good, but also motivate them to do their best work and follow you wherever you go. 

The rule number eight: is to love the passengers on your bus.

Here’s how.

First, be sure to take your time and listen. Remember, love and relationships need a while to develop and blossom. So, just as you need to spend time with your partner to build your relationship, you’ve got to spend time with your employees. Regular individual meetings are essential; they offer an opportunity for you to get to know your team personally.

For instance, you should never send an electronic birthday message. Rather, write out real birthday cards for each person on your team.

The rule number nine: Purpose and fun will propel you to new heights. Its needed to understand that purpose makes the work easier. 

A story about President Johnson and a janitor at NASA offers a great example. The president was visiting the space program when he encountered a custodian enthusiastically cleaning the floors. The president told the man that he was probably the best janitor he had ever met, to which the janitor responded, “Sir, I’m not a janitor. I just helped put a man on the moon.”

It just goes to show that, with a higher purpose, you can easily accomplish everyday tasks, and that’s why rule number nine is to let yourself be driven by a higher purpose. Most importantly, purpose and fun can enable stellar performances. 

Last rule, number ten: you have got to have fun on your ride. After all, success is much easier to attain when you’re enjoying yourself, rather than stressing out.

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Learning 655

A brain dump is a way of externalizing everything your brain is struggling to hold onto so that it can focus on doing what it’s really built for: solving problems and coming up with new ideas.

So, at the beginning of your workweek and each day, do yourself a favor and write down these tasks so that you don’t need to waste energy trying to keep track of what still needs to be done.

This simple but helpful technique will give your brain the space it needs to help you take action and get things done.

It’s not just grocery lists and tasks, either; you can free up brain space by writing down everything from unfinished projects you want to take care of to books you want to read or a brilliant idea you don’t want to forget. And if you don’t want to carry around a pen and paper, you can jot it down on a notebook app on your mobile device.

Another way of freeing up some much-needed brain power is to tackle easy tasks right as they appear. Why bother writing something down or trying to remember it if you can take care of it right away? If there’s a book you need to get your hands on, order it right away if you can.

Learning 654

The Rule of 3 

The rule of 3 was introduced by J.D. Meier, a Microsoft executive who explains how it works in his book, Getting Results the Agile Way.

Basically, you should start every week by identifying three things to accomplish that week. Then, you should start every workday by identifying three goals you want to accomplish by the time you go to sleep.

It might sound simple, but that’s part of why it’s so effective. By looking ahead at what you want to have accomplished both day by day and week by week, you’re already figuring out how best to structure your time, attention and energy on what’s important.

So let’s say your end-of-the-week goals are to finish the first section of your book, update your website with new content and renew your passport.

With these goals in place, your end-of-the-day goals might be to finish the next chapter of the book you’re working on, decide upon the topic for your next blog post and fill out the passport renewal form.

When you’re setting these goals, check your calendar.

To prevent yourself from choosing goals that are too ambitious or unrealistic, you need to consult your calendar to make sure you haven’t already dedicated your time and energy to another task. For example, even though you want to finish that section of your book, if your calendar reminds you of a big presentation you’re scheduled to give on Friday, it may be best to focus on preparing for that instead.

Remember, being productive also means being smart about your schedule, so don’t set yourself up for failure by setting unattainable goals.

Learning 635

“IF IT’S ON THE CALENDER, IT HAPPENS.” – Gretchen Rubin 

The strategy of scheduling is one of the most familiar and powerful strategies of habit formation. It also forces us to confront the natural limits of the day. Scheduling one activity makes that time unavailable for anything else. It makes activities automatic, which builds habits.

The 10 Minutes Mantra 

*Turn your life in just 10 minutes*
My dad once told me : “You can apply the 10 minutes mantra to turn around your life in a tremendous way.”
I didn’t understand at first. “What’s the big deal in 10 minutes?” I asked.
“There’s indeed a big deal about it. 10 minutes, believe me son, can create a marvellous difference in our life,” my dad offered wisely.
“Elaborate please, dad,”
“I’ll tell you. But first, you’ve to get up tomorrow at 6.00 am.” My dad conditioned. I agreed.
Next day, as I woke up at the agreed time, my dad came to my room.
“What’s the time?”
“6.00 am” I replied.
“Okay, so before you can follow the 10 minutes mantra, you have to “follow the art of being aware about the clock,”
I was confused. My dad continued, “Look at the clock. It’s 6.00 am. Now within 10 minutes I ask you to do the following – Arrange your bed and your table; drink two glasses of water, wash your face and brush your teeth. But keep looking at your clock while doing these. That’s it”
“Well…Okay,” I said, thinking what could be the catch my dad wanted me to capture.
I began and started doing all he asked. All the time, I kept glancing at the wall clock. Finally after 10 minutes (or 30 seconds earlier to be exact) I had finished it all.
“Well done, boy. You have turned around your life!” My dad praised, patting on my back.
“What?” I was astonished and puzzled, unable to grasp, and asked earnestly “I didn’t get you, dad.”
 “Think, son, think!” My dad urged, “Recall your earlier days. How did your day started off?”
I racked my brains and pondered over. Usually, I wake up at 6.00 am. Then, I wander off, yawning lazily and even sleep for some more minutes or sit idly on my chair, my thoughts in thousand directions. And, by the time I finish the above activities, it was already past 7.00 am.
“And today, it’s just 6.10 am” my dad said as if he read my mind.
“Yes!” I exclaimed, starting to understand.
“So what made you do it?” my dad asked.
I thought. What made me do it? Because my dad told me to do? No, no. There was more to it. And then it hit me.
*“ The art of being aware about the clock!”* I almost shouted.

“Yes and also ten minutes.” My dad said, smiling at my wonderstruck face.
My dad explained: “By setting your eyes on the clock and thinking about 10 minutes, your mind got *focused* in that span of 10 minutes. It was just like a deadline or a due date. *The10 minutesdeadline kept your mind in the present; in the “NOW ” and prevented you from wandering off.”*
I was impressed. Just a matter of meagre 10 minutes had such a mighty effect! I had completed all those routine activities on time.  Now, I felt I have so much time ahead (as compared to 7.00am, it was just 6.10 am!). With so much time saved, I could work on creative and productive activities, instead of loitering around aimlessly. *Time is indeed, the most precious thing on earth.*
 A question piqued my curiosity, “Dad, why only 10 minutes. Why can’t we divide our activities into 1 hour slots?”
“Good question,” my dad said, “we can. But Shorter the time, *more productive* you will get. Imagine, if I told you to do those routine activities in 1 hour? Your mind will make your actions slower because you’ll think you have enough time to do it. Even if an activity takes 1 hour, you can segment it into 10 minutes slots.”
“Give an example,” I was eager to know more.
“You can, for instance, segment your workout time,” my dad resumed. “10 minutes- warm-up; 10 minutes- stretching and 10 minutes-yoga,”
“Really amazing, dad; this 10 minutes stuff can make your life on a roll! Instead of long bouts of inactivity, once can benefit from the short bursts of creativity!”
“Yes. The 10 minutes stuff is just an idea. You can also make it 15 minutes or 20 minutes but not longer than that.” My dad paused and continued :
“The 10 minutes mantra can be applied in every aspect of life. A student, a professional, a businessman or anyone can apply this simple but successful technique. Take an example of student. The student can allot 10 minutes time for a topic. After that, he/she can take 2 minutes rest and resume for another ten minutes. He or she can also take time off and read a good book for 10 minutes or allot just 10 minutes for walking. All a student has to do is to be aware of the clock.
Elaborating it further, _we humans have a tendency to keep on delaying small things_. We know we have to pay bills on time, and still we delay it beyond the due dates. We are aware that our bike’s tyres need to get pumped, yet we don’t care to stop by the car-shop we pass every day. We promise ourselves to go to a temple on a particular day, yet we never seem to keep our own promise on time. Why? Because our mind wanders off and deems such things as unimportant. If we vow to take just 10 minutes or 20 minutes of our entire 24 hours, we would never procrastinate and our life will be million times better.”
 My dad concluded: “ The 10 minutes, if followed *consistently*, can have a tremendous effect in anyone’s lifestyle. *Procrastination* and *Idleness* will vanish away replaced by *Focus* and *Intensity*. People will tell you they are short of time. No time for the loved ones, no time for pursuing their dreams, no time to eat, no time for their health as if they are the most busiest people on earth! It’s the lamest excuse one can give.
*The 10 minutes mantra can keep us Organized, keep our otherwise disoriented thoughts in check, Balance our life fruitfully and help us to have enough time in our hands. So follow this 10 minutes mantra and see your life turn around at a miraculous pace…..!”*

Learning 582

The story of practically every great fortune starts with the day when a creator of ideas and a seller of ideas got together and worked in harmony. 

The story of watermelons by Manohar Parrikar 

“I am from the village of Parra in Goa, hence we are called Parrikars. My village is famous for its watermelons. 

When I was a child, the farmers would organise a watermelon-eating contest at the end of the harvest season in May. All the kids would be invited to eat as many watermelons as they wanted. 

Years later, I went to IIT Mumbai to study engineering. I went back to my village after 6.5 years. I went to the market looking for watermelons. They were all gone. The ones that were there were so small. 

I went to see the farmer who hosted the watermelon-eating contest. His son had taken over. He would host the contest but there was a difference. 

When the older farmer gave us watermelons to eat he would ask us to spit out the seeds into a bowl. We were told not to bite into the seeds. He was collecting the seeds for his next crop. We were unpaid child labourers, actually. 

He kept his best watermelons for the contest and he got the best seeds which would yield even bigger watermelons the next year. 

His son, when he took over, realised that the larger watermelons would fetch more money in the market so he sold the larger ones and kept the smaller ones for the contest. 

The next year, the watermelons were smaller, the year later even small. In watermelons the generation is one year. In seven years, Parra’s best watermelons were finished. 

In humans, generations change after 25 years. It will take us 200 years to figure what we were doing wrong while educating our children.”

Unless we employ our best to train the next generation, this is what can happen to us. We must attract the best.